resources
Special section: Enterprise Architecture Books!

239 books.
List by Date, Author or Rating.

8
Nicolai M. Josuttis (2007)

SOA in Practice: The Art of Distributed System Design

This book demonstrates service-oriented architecture (SOA) as a concrete discipline rather than a hopeful collection of cloud charts. Built upon the author's firsthand experience rolling out a SOA at a major corporation, SOA in Practice explains how SOA can simplify the creation and maintenance of large-scale applications. Whether your project involves a large set of Web Services-based components, or connects legacy applications to modern business processes, this book clarifies how -- and whether -- SOA fits your needs.

Dan Woods, Thomas Mattern (2006)

Enterprise SOA

Information Technology professionals can use this book to move beyond the excitement of web services and service oriented architecture (SOA) and begin the process of finding actionable ideas to innovate and create business value. In Enterprise SOA: Designing IT for Business Innovation, SAP's blueprint for putting SOA to work is analyzed from top to bottom. In addition to design, development, and architecture, vital contextual issues such as governance, security, change management, and culture are also explored. This comprehensive perspective reduces risk as IT departments implement ESA, a sound, flexible architecture for adapting business processes in response to changing market conditions. Based on extensive research with experts from the German software company SAP, this definitive book is ideal for architects, developers, and other IT professionals who want to understand the technology and business relevance of ESA in a detailed way - especially those who want to move on the technology now, rather than in the next year or two.

5
Sandy Carter (2007)

The New Language of Business: SOA and Web 2.0

In The New Language of Business, senior IBM executive Sandy Carter demonstrates how to leverage SOA, Web 2.0, and related technologies to drive new levels of operational excellence and business innovation. Writing for executives and business leaders inside and outside IT, Carter explains why flexibility and responsiveness are now even more crucial to success–and why services-based strategies offer the greatest promise for achieving them. You’ll learn how to organize your business into reusable process components–and support them with cost-effective IT services that adapt quickly and easily to change. Then, using extensive examples - including a detailed case study describing IBM’s own experience - Carter identifies best practices, pitfalls, and practical starting points for success.

8
Helen Sharp, Yvonne Rogers, Jenny Preece (2007)

Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction

The classic text, Interaction Design by Sharp, Preece and Rogers is back in a fantastic new 2nd Edition! New to this edition: Completely updated to include new chapters on Interfaces, Data Gathering and Data Analysis and Interpretation, the latest information from recent research findings and new examples.

2
James McGovern, Scott W. Ambler, Michael E. Stevens, James Linn, Elias K. Jo, Vikas Sharan (2003)

The Practical Guide to Enterprise Architecture

The role of the enterprise architecture professional is one of the most challenging roles in information technology today. Many aspects of the role are technical, while much more of the job is becoming political. To say the least, it is a challenging position. Many enterprise architects have significant responsibility, but do not have the necessary authority to bring about success. The primary focus of this book is to be a guide and trusted advisor to those who want to be successful in this pursuit. Through real-world examples from experts who have filled the role of enterprise architect, the reader will learn how to solve complex problems, maintain technical competencies, and make a positive impact on the overall business. The most successful architecture will have an architect that can describe the motivation behind the technical choices; this book provides the background the practitioners will need to become the enterprise evangelist.

8
Roel Wagter, Martin van den Berg, Joost Luijpers, Marlies van Steenbergen (2005)

Dynamic Enterprise Architecture: How to Make It Work

This book presents an approach to enterprise architecture, which enables corporations to achieve their business objectives faster. Focusing on the governance of IT in the organization, it provides tangible tools, advice and strategies for implementing and designing the architectural process within a corporation that will make a major contribution in driving the business forward and achieve its goals.

7
Jason Bloomberg, Ronald Schmelzer (2006)

Service Orient or Be Doomed!: How Service Orientation Will Change Your Business

Authors Jason Bloomberg and Ronald Schmelzer - senior analysts for IT advisory and analysis firm ZapThink - say it all in the title of their new book, Service Orient or Be Doomed!: How Service Orientation Will Change Your Business. That is, if you fail to service orient your company, you will fail in competing with the organizations that do. This provocative new book takes service orientation out of its more familiar technological surroundings within service-oriented architecture and introduces it as a philosophy that advocates its rightful place within a business context, redefining it as a new way of thinking about organizing your business and its processes. Informal, challenging, and intelligent in style, Service Orient or Be Doomed!: How Service Orientation Will Change Your Business shows you how you can best use technology resources to meet your company's business goals and empower your company to go from stuck to competitive.

Norbert Bieberstein, Sanjay Bose, Marc Fiammante, Keith Jones, Rawn Shah (2005)

Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) Compass: Business Value, Planning, and Enterprise Roadmap

In this developerWorks Series book, IBM Enterprise Integration Team experts present a start-to-finish guide to planning, implementing, and managing Service-Oriented Architecture. Drawing on their extensive experience helping enterprise customers migrate to SOA, the authors share hard-earned lessons and best practices for architects, project managers, and software development leaders alike. Well-written and practical, Service-Oriented Architecture Compass offers the perfect blend of principles and "how-to" guidance for transitioning your infrastructure to SOA. The authors clearly explain what SOA is, the opportunities it offers, and how it differs from earlier approaches. Using detailed examples from IBM consulting engagements, they show how to deploy SOA solutions that tightly integrate with your processes and operations, delivering maximum flexibility and value. With detailed coverage of topics ranging from policy-based management to workflow implementation, no other SOA book offers comparable value to workingIT professionals. Coverage includes SOA from both a business and technical standpoint–and how to make the business case; Planning your SOA project: best practices and pitfalls to avoid; SOA analysis and design for superior flexibility and value; Securing and managing your SOA environment; Using SOA to simplify enterprise application integration; Implementing business processes and workflow in SOA environments; Case studies in SOA deployment; and After you've deployed: delivering better collaboration, greater scalability, and more sophisticated applications

8
Peter Brooks (2006)

Metrics for IT Service Management

Many organizations find it very difficult to use metrics properly, and badly designed metrics can be actively harmful to proper business functioning. This book addresses the causes of the difficulties and presents workable solutions. It provides a general guide to the design, implementation and use of metrics as a mechanism to control and steer IT service organizations, and specific recommendations for applying metrics across ITIL, ISO20000 (BS15000) and other processes, discussing the rationale of the recommendations.

5
Larstan Editors (2006)

Secrets of SOA: An Enterprise View on Service-Oriented Architecture Deployment Revealed

Targeted at management, the first six chapters of Secrets of SOA focus on the business impact of service-oriented architecture technological decisions with an emphasis on cost, flexibility, and the ability to maintain business objectives. Each of the six chapters explores a different topic that illustrates the value of a physically integrated SOA infrastructure organized at the enterprise level. Taken together, they demonstrate why enterprise-level planning, backed by a centralized deployment strategy, is essential to the success of SOA. Aimed at the IT executive, the second half of the book deals with specific IT issues raised by SOAs and why these issues are best dealt with on an enterprise level. Among the topics covered in these eight chapters are virtualizing resources, managing heterogeneous workloads, maintaining data and transactional integrity, and the value of proximity.

Koen Brand, Harry Boonen (2004)

IT Governance: A Pocket Guide Based on COBIT

CIOs and IT managers will improve their organization's performance with this look at security management and the security-based COBIT. Informed by common ISO quality and security standards, ITIL, the Common Scoreboard, and COBIT, the accepted standard for good IT security and control practices, this reference provides a succinct framework for IT management.

8
Paul Allen (2006)

Service Orientation: Winning Strategies and Best Practices

Companies face major challenges as they seek to flourish in competitive global markets, fuelled by developments in technology, from the Internet to grid computing and Web services. In this environment, service orientation - aligning business processes to the changing demands of customers - is emerging as a highly effective approach to increasing efficiency. In this book, Paul Allen provides an accessible guide to service orientation, showing how it works and highlighting the benefits it can deliver. The book provides an integrated approach: after covering the basics of service orientation, he discusses key issues such as business agility, designing quality-of-service infrastructure, implementing service-level agreements, and cultural factors. He provides roadmaps, definitions, templates, techniques, process patterns and checklists to help you realize service orientation. These resources are reinforced with detailed case studies, from the transport and banking sectors. Packed with valuable insights, the book will be essential reading for CIOs, IT architects and senior developers. IT facing business executives will also benefit from understanding how software services can enable their business strategies. Paul Allen is a principal business-IT strategist at CA and is widely recognized for his innovative work in component-based development (CBD), business-IT alignment and service-oriented architecture. With over thirty years experience of large-scale business systems, he is an established author whose previous book was the critically acclaimed 'Realizing e-Business with Components'. Sam Higgins is now with Forrester Research Inc.; formerly he managed the Innovation and Planning Unit of Queensland Transport's Information Services Branch. Paul McRae is the application architect in the Innovation and Planning Unit of Queensland Transport's Information Services Branch. Hermann Schlamann is a senior architect in the architecture group of Credit Suisse.

7
Dirk Krafzig, Karl Banke, Dirk Slama (2004)

Enterprise SOA: Service-Oriented Architecture Best Practices

This book spells out guidelines and strategies for successfully using Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) in large-scale projects. SOA represents the latest paradigm in distributed computing and middleware development. However,SOA is not a revolution, but rather an evolution in software architecture. SOA is a collection of best practice software construction principles accompanied by proven methodologies in development and project management. This book is unique in that it offers a pragmatic approach to the topic. The authors borrow from their more than forty years of collective enterprise experience, and offer a frank discussion of the challenges associated with adopting SOA. They also help readers ensure that their organization does not become too closely tied to a specific technology. The result is a detailed introduction to the topic and an architectural blueprint for implementing SOA.

7
Thomas Erl (2005)

Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA): Concepts, Technology, and Design

This is a comprehensive tutorial that teaches fundamental and advanced SOA design principles, supplemented with detailed case studies and technologies used to implement SOAs in the real world. All major software manufacturers and vendors are promoting support for SOA. As a result, every major development platform now officially supports the creation of service-oriented solutions. Parts I, II, and III cover basic and advanced SOA concepts and theory that prepare you for Parts IV and V, which provide a series of step-by-step how to instructions for building an SOA. Part V further contains coverage of WS-* technologies and SOA platform support provided by J2EE and .NET.

5
Chris Anderson (2006)

The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less of More

"The Long Tail" is a powerful new force in our economy: the rise of the niche. As the cost of reaching consumers drops dramatically, our markets are shifting from a one-size-fits-all model of mass appeal to one of unlimited variety for unique tastes. From supermarket shelves to advertising agencies, the ability to offer vast choice is changing everything, and causing us to rethink where our markets lie and how to get to them. Unlimited selection is revealing truths about what consumers want and how they want to get it, from DVDs at Netflix to songs on iTunes to advertising on Google. However, this is not just a virtue of online marketplaces; it is an example of an entirely new economic model for business, one that is just beginning to show its power. After a century of obsessing over the few products at the head of the demand curve, the new economics of distribution allow us to turn our focus to the many more products in the tail, which collectively can create a new market as big as the one we already know. The Long Tail is really about the economics of abundance. New efficiencies in distribution, manufacturing, and marketing are essentially resetting the definition of whats commercially viable across the board. If the 20th century was about hits, the 21st will be equally about niches.

5
Randy A. Steinberg (2001)

Measuring ITIL: Measuring, Reporting and Modeling - the IT Service Management Metrics That Matter Most to IT Senior Executives

How do you measure and report your ITIL processes? Which ITIL metrics matter the most to Senior Executives? Finally, there is a book that shows you how! This is not a theoretical treatise, but a practical guide that shows you the operational metrics to use and how these can be calculated into Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and Critical Success factors (CSFs) that resonate with Senior Management. In this book you will learn about: Defining and building a comprehensive ITIL metrics program; Which metrics are the most important and how to calculate them; Dealing with staff resistance to a metrics program; Tips and suggestions for what to do if inadequate tools and reporting exist; Suggested work plan for how to build your metrics program step-by-step. In addition, this book contains a helpful CD with a helpful IT Service Management modeling tool that covers all 10 ITIL processes. Simply enter your key operational metrics and the KPIs and CSFs get automatically calculated! This is a comprehensive guide for building any ITIL metrics program with all the information you need in one place.

5
Fenix Theuerkorn (2004)

Lightweight Enterprise Architectures

The author developed Lightweight Enterprise Architecture (LEA) to enable a quick alignment of technology to business strategy. LEA's simple and effective framework makes it useful to a wide audience of users throughout an enterprise, coordinating resources for business requirements and facilitating optimal adoption of technology. Lightweight Enterprise Architectures provides a methodology and philosophy that organizations can easily adopt, resulting in immediate value-add without the pitfalls of traditional architectural styles. This systematic approach uses the right balance of tools and techniques to help an enterprise successfully develop its architecture. The first section of the text focuses on how enterprises deploy architecture and how architecture is an evolving discipline. The second section introduces LEA, detailing a structure that supports architecture and benefits all stakeholders. The book concludes by explaining the approach needed to put the framework into practice, analyzing deployment issues and how the architecture is involved throughout the lifecycle of technology projects and systems. This innovative resource tool provides you with a simpler, easily executable architecture, the ability to embrace a complex environment, and a framework to measure and control technology at the enterprise level.

7
Steven H. Spewak, Steven C. Hill (1992)

Enterprise Architecture Planning: Developing a Blueprint for Data, Applications and Technology

More advanced than traditional system planning approaches, Enterprise Architecture Planning (EAP) outlines a stable business model independent of organizational boundaries, systems and procedures; defines data before applications; and allows data to determine the sequence for implementing application systems. This invaluable book offers a common-sense approach to EAP and includes numerous examples of architectures, procedures, checklists and useful guidelines. The book was described as a substantive contribution to the body of IS planning knowledge by John A. Zachman.

7
Mark Lankhorst et al (2005)

Enterprise Architecture at Work: Modelling, Communication and Analysis

An enterprise architecture tries to describe and control an organisation's structure, processes, applications, systems and techniques in an integrated way. The unambiguous specification and description of components and their relationships in such an architecture requires a coherent architecture modelling language. Lankhorst and his co-authors present such an enterprise modelling language, ArchiMate, that captures the complexity of architectural domains and their relations and allows the construction of integrated enterprise architecture models. They provide architects with concrete instruments that improve their architectural practice. As this is not enough, they additionally present techniques and heuristics for communicating with all relevant stakeholders about these architectures. Since an architecture model is useful not only for providing insight into the current or future situation but can also be used to evaluate the transition from 'as-is' to 'to-be', the authors also describe analysis methods for assessing both the qualitative impact of changes to an architecture and the quantitative aspects of architectures, such as performance and cost issues. The modelling language and the other techniques presented have been proven in practice in many real-life case studies. So this book is an ideal companion for enterprise IT or business architects in industry as well as for computer or management science students studying the field of enterprise architecture.

8
Peter Weill, Jeanne Ross (2004)

IT Governance: How Top Performers Manage IT Decision Rights for Superior Results

Seventy percent of all IT projects fail - and scores of books have attempted to help firms measure and manage IT systems and processes better in order to turn this figure around. In this book, IT experts Peter D. Weill and Jeanne W. Ross argue that the real reason IT fails to deliver value is that companies have no formal system in place for guiding and monitoring IT decisions. Their research shows that firms with explicit IT governance systems have twice the profit of firms with poor governance, given the same strategic objectives. Just as corporate governance systems aim to ensure quality decisions about corporate assets, the authors show, companies need IT governance systems to ensure that IT investments are made wisely and effectively.

4
Jeffrey D. Kaplan (2005)

Strategic IT Portfolio Management

Strategic IT Portfolio Management delivers a solution to the IT dilemma that has evolved over the past 40 years - namely, how do we get the most value from our IT investment? Author Jeff Kaplan, a lead partner in the Strategic IT Management Practice at consulting firm PRTM, puts nearly two decades of expertise to work exploring and identifying the knowledge, techniques, and strategies needed to maximize technology investments and achieve long-term business transformation for all types of organizations. Written for executives from all disciplines, the book highlights many of the root causes of the IT value dilemma and explains how executives can prevent and counter these issues. Readers will learn the portfolio management methods essential to achieving value. The book provides executives with the tools to: - Illuminate, assess, and improve existing practices - Design a governance structure and allocate appropriate decision rights - Ensure centralized control with decentralized execution - Increase collaboration between business-unit and IT leadership - Instill a culture of continuous improvement and innovation Executives, board members, policymakers, analysts, and the media all want to know: are companies spending too much on information technology (IT)? But the question they should ask is whether organizations are seeing sufficient value from their IT investment - the value that comes from effectively managing technology as part of overall business transformation. Many organizations don't know how to move from managing technology to managing overall business transformation. Large-scale transformation efforts often go awry because the business leadership team and IT project teams are out of sync. In most of these cases, the organization lacks a governance method that fuses strategic management of the business, the technology, and the projects. Portfolio management is the governance method that's needed. Strategic IT Portfolio Management describes the portfolio management governance method necessary for transformation success. This book highlights many of the root causes for the IT dilemma and explains how executives can prevent and counter these issues. Readers gain an inside look at how portfolio management can instill a culture of continuous improvement and innovation within the organization.

5
John P. Kotter, Dan S. Cohen (2002)

The Heart of Change: Real-Life Stories of How People Change Their Organizations

John Kotter's international bestseller Leading Change struck a powerful chord with legions of managers everywhere. It acknowledged the cynicism, pain, and fear they faced in implementing large-scale change-but also armed them with an eight-step plan of action for leaping boldly forward in a turbulent world. Now, Kotter and coauthor Dan S. Cohen delve deeper into the subject of change to get to the heart of how change actually happens. Through compelling, real-life stories from people in the trenches, in all kinds of organizations, the authors attack the fundamental problem that underlies every major transformation: How do you go beyond simply getting your message across to truly changing people's behavior? Based on interviews within over 100 organizations in the midst of large-scale change, The Heart of Change delivers the simple yet provocative answer to this question, forever altering the way organizations and individuals approach change. While most companies believe change happens by making people think differently, Kotter and Cohen say the key lies in making them feel differently. They introduce a new dynamic-"see-feel-change"-that fuels action by showing people potent reasons for change that spark their emotions. Organized around the revolutionary eight-step change process introduced in Leading Change, this story-driven book shows how the best change leaders use not just reports or analysis, but gloves, video cameras, airplanes, office design, and other concrete elements to impel people toward positive action. The authors reveal how this appeal to the heart-over the mind-motivates people to overcome even daunting obstacles to change and produce breathtaking results. For individuals in every walk of life and companies in every stage of change, this compact, no-nonsense book captures the heart-and the how-of successful change. John P. Kotter, world-renowned expert on leadership at the Harvard Business School, is the author of many books, including the award-winning, best-selling Leading Change. Dan S. Cohen is a Principal with Deloitte Consulting LLC.

7
John P. Kotter (1996)

Leading Change

In Leading Change, John Kotter examines the efforts of more than 100 companies to remake themselves into better competitors. He identifies the most common mistakes leaders and managers make in attempting to create change and offers an eight-step process to overcome the obstacles and carry out the firm's agenda: establishing a greater sense of urgency, creating the guiding coalition, developing a vision and strategy, communicating the change vision, empowering others to act, creating short-term wins, consolidating gains and producing even more change, and institutionalizing new approaches in the future. This highly personal book reveals what John Kotter has seen, heard, experienced, and concluded in 25 years of working with companies to create lasting transformation.

6
Robert J. Benson, Tom Bugnitz, Bill Walton (2004)

From Business Strategy to IT Action: Right Decisions for a Better Bottom Line

From Business Strategy to IT Action gives companies of all sizes the tools to effectively link IT to business strategy and produce effective, actionable strategies for bottom-line results. The authors present CEOs, CFOs, CIOs, and IT managers with a powerful and accessible resource packed with such useful material as the Strategy-to-Bottom-Line Value Chain, which integrates the management practices relating to planning, prioritization, alignment, and assessing a company's entire IT budget; methods for using IT Impact Management to establish IT culture and performance models for the business/IT connection; the IT Improvement Zone, which quickly identifies where a company can focus its energies for maximum results, etc.

7
Nicholas Carr (2004)

Does IT Matter? Information Technology and the Corrosion of Competitive Advantage

A bold and controversial manifesto on where information technology is headed, how its role in business strategy will dramatically change, and what this all means for business managers and IT suppliers. Does IT Matter provides the first cogent explanation of IT’s dramatically changing business role, its levelling influence on competition, and the practical implications for business managers and IT suppliers. A convincing manifesto on one of the most important business phenomena of our time, “Does IT Matter?” will play a central role in our ongoing debate about the future of IT.

John P. Kotter et al (2006)

Harvard Business Review on Leading Through Change

Seventy percent of all change initiatives fail. Yours won’t have to—when you apply the practices provided in HBR on Leading Through Change. In this vital new resource, today’s leading thinkers offer suggestions for articulating a compelling vision of an organization’s future, overcoming employee resistance to change, and surmounting other challenges that come with leading change.

Grady Booch, Robert A. Maksimchuk, Michael W. Engel, Bobbi J. Young, Jim Conallen, Kelli A. Houston (1994)

Object-Oriented Analysis and Design with Applications (3rd Edition)

Grady Booch et al draws upon the rich and varied results of those projects and offers improved methods for object development and a new, unified notation. With numerous examples implemented in C++, Booch illustrates essential concepts, explains the method, and shows successful applications in a variety of fields. Booch also gives pragmatic advice on a host of issues, including classification, implementation strategies, and cost-effective project management. A two-time winner of Software Development's coveted Jolt Cola Product Excellence Award! Object-Oriented Design with Applications has long been the essential reference to object-oriented technology, which, in turn, has evolved to join the mainstream of industrial-strength software development. In this third edition--the first revision in 13 years--readers can learn to apply object-oriented methods using new paradigms such as Java, the Unified Modeling Language (UML) 2.0, and .NET. The authors draw upon their rich and varied experience to offer improved methods for object development and numerous examples that tackle the complex problems faced by software engineers, including systems architecture, data acquisition, cryptoanalysis, control systems, and Web development. They illustrate essential concepts, explain the method, and show successful applications in a variety of fields. You'll also find pragmatic advice on a host of issues, including classification, implementation strategies, and cost-effective project management.

6
Marianne Broadbent, Ellen Kitzis (2004)

The New CIO Leader: Setting the Agenda and Delivering Results

As information technology becomes increasingly essential within organizations, the reputation and role of the CIO has been diminishing. To regain credibility and avoid obscurity, CIOs must take on a larger, more strategic role. Here is a blueprint for doing exactly that. This book shows how CIOs can bridge the gap between IT and the rest of the organization and finally make IT a strategic advantage rather than a cost sink.

Spencer Johnson (1998)

Who Moved My Cheese? An Amazing Way to Deal with Change in Your Work and in Your Life

Change can be a blessing or a curse, depending on your perspective. The message of Who Moved My Cheese? is that all can come to see it as a blessing, if they understand the nature of cheese and the role it plays in their lives. Who Moved My Cheese? is a parable that takes place in a maze. Four beings live in that maze: Sniff and Scurry are mice--nonanalytical and nonjudgmental, they just want cheese and are willing to do whatever it takes to get it. Hem and Haw are "littlepeople," mouse-size humans who have an entirely different relationship with cheese. It's not just sustenance to them; it's their self-image. Their lives and belief systems are built around the cheese they've found. Most of us reading the story will see the cheese as something related to our livelihoods--our jobs, our career paths, the industries we work in--although it can stand for anything, from health to relationships. The point of the story is that we have to be alert to changes in the cheese, and be prepared to go running off in search of new sources of cheese when the cheese we have runs out. Dr. Johnson, coauthor of The One Minute Manager and many other books, presents this parable to business, church groups, schools, military organizations--anyplace where you find people who may fear or resist change. And although more analytical and skeptical readers may find the tale a little too simplistic, its beauty is that it sums up all natural history in just 94 pages: Things change. They always have changed and always will change. And while there's no single way to deal with change, the consequence of pretending change won't happen is always the same: The cheese runs out. --Lou Schuler Book Description: The Change Survival Kit is an A-Mazing Way to Deal with Changes in Your Work and in Your Life. It reminds you to use what you discovered in the "Cheese" story - and enjoy it!

7
Jaap Schekkerman (2005)

The Economic Benefits of Enterprise Architecture

Most organisations have problems to explain and manage the economic benefits of Enterprise Architecture. Managers often asked me what Enterprise Architecture can do for me. At the same time several Governmental organisations are adopting Enterprise Architecture as part of their change and E-Government initiatives. A holistic Enterprise Architecture approach can deliver a lot of benefits to organisations depending on the focus where to find these benefits. Even so Enterprise Architecture delivers the foundation for Enterprise Portfolio Management, the ultimate business driver for Enterprise Architecture. The main purpose of this book is achieving awareness at management level as well as at enterprise architects level about adopting an economic approach when dealing with Enterprise Architecture programs. This book explains the areas of economic benefits of Enterprise Architecture programs, the different views as well as a holistic approach to show the areas of economic benefits. Economic methods, models and approaches are described in short to show, how to quantify and manage the economic benefits of Enterprise Architecture programs as well as how Enterprise Architecture supports Enterprise Portfolio Management. This book has not the intention to be a scientific research document, nor a handbook to deliver solutions for all your EA related economic issues.

6
Jane Carbone (2004)

IT Architecture Toolkit

Enterprise IT architecture made practical -- finally! There's only one way to maximize legacy infrastructure while integrating new partners, technologies, applications, and data streams: begin with a coherent enterprise architecture. But most approaches to enterprise architecture have been far too complex and theoretical--until now. IT Architecture Toolkit is a breakthrough: a practical, simple, rapid, and complete approach to delivering on the promise of enterprise architecture. Jane Carbone's approach has been proven in mid-market and Fortune 500 enterprises alike. Step by step, Carbone shows how to integrate business, architecture, implementation, and all key outputs: for data, applications, technology, and people. Whether you're an IT leader, architect, planner, or analyst, you'll learn how to create strong, auditable links with business drivers; model your architecture simply, easily, and quickly; translate your models to real, manageable projects; define the value proposition for architecture and establish realistic metrics; achieve buy-in throughout your organization; and manage the soft aspects of your architecture initiative, including processes, roles, responsibilities, and organizational structure. Carbone provides a soup to nuts collection of methods and examples. Using her exercises, you will construct a complete draft architecture for your own business: one that will handle change, opportunity, growth, mergers, downsizing, whatever comes your way.

5
Thomas L. Friedman (2005)

The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century

Thomas L. Friedman is not so much a futurist, which he is sometimes called, as a presentist. His aim in The World Is Flat, as in his earlier, influential Lexus and the Olive Tree, is not to give you a speculative preview of the wonders that are sure to come in your lifetime, but rather to get you caught up on the wonders that are already here. The world isn't going to be flat, it is flat, which gives Friedman's breathless narrative much of its urgency, and which also saves it from the Epcot-style polyester sheen that futurists--the optimistic ones at least--are inevitably prey to. What Friedman means by "flat" is "connected": the lowering of trade and political barriers and the exponential technical advances of the digital revolution that have made it possible to do business, or almost anything else, instantaneously with billions of other people across the planet. This in itself should not be news to anyone. But the news that Friedman has to deliver is that just when we stopped paying attention to these developments--when the dot-com bust turned interest away from the business and technology pages and when 9/11 and the Iraq War turned all eyes toward the Middle East--is when they actually began to accelerate. Globalization 3.0, as he calls it, is driven not by major corporations or giant trade organizations like the World Bank, but by individuals: desktop freelancers and innovative startups all over the world (but especially in India and China) who can compete--and win--not just for low-wage manufacturing and information labor but, increasingly, for the highest-end research and design work as well. (He doesn't forget the "mutant supply chains" like Al-Qaeda that let the small act big in more destructive ways.)

Malcolm Gladwell (2002)

The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference

"The best way to understand the dramatic transformation of unknown books into bestsellers, or the rise of teenage smoking, or the phenomena of word of mouth or any number of the other mysterious changes that mark everyday life," writes Malcolm Gladwell, "is to think of them as epidemics. Ideas and products and messages and behaviors spread just like viruses do." Although anyone familiar with the theory of memetics will recognize this concept, Gladwell's The Tipping Point has quite a few interesting twists on the subject. For example, Paul Revere was able to galvanize the forces of resistance so effectively in part because he was what Gladwell calls a "Connector": he knew just about everybody, particularly the revolutionary leaders in each of the towns that he rode through. But Revere "wasn't just the man with the biggest Rolodex in colonial Boston," he was also a "Maven" who gathered extensive information about the British. He knew what was going on and he knew exactly whom to tell. The phenomenon continues to this day--think of how often you've received information in an e-mail message that had been forwarded at least half a dozen times before reaching you. Gladwell develops these and other concepts (such as the "stickiness" of ideas or the effect of population size on information dispersal) through simple, clear explanations and entertainingly illustrative anecdotes, such as comparing the pedagogical methods of Sesame Street and Blue's Clues, or explaining why it would be even easier to play Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon with the actor Rod Steiger. Although some readers may find the transitional passages between chapters hold their hands a little too tightly, and Gladwell's closing invocation of the possibilities of social engineering sketchy, even chilling, The Tipping Point is one of the most effective books on science for a general audience in ages. It seems inevitable that "tipping point," like "future shock" or "chaos theory," will soon become one of those ideas that everybody knows--or at least knows by name. --Ron Hogan Book Description: This celebrated New York Times bestsellernow poised to reach an even wider audience in paperbackis a book that is changing the way North Americans think about selling products and disseminating ideas. Gladwells new afterword to this edition describes how readers can constructively apply the tipping point principle in their own lives and work. Widely hailed as an important work that offers not only a road map to business success but also a profoundly encouraging approach to solving social problems.

8
A Mulholland, C. S. Thomas, P Kurchina (2007)

Mashup Corporations: The End of Business as Usual

Mashup Corporations: The End of Business As Usual tells the tale of Vorpal Inc., a company that pioneers the implementation of service-oriented architecture to transform its business model. CEO Jane Moneymaker believes in marketing manager Hugo Wunderkind's idea of creating a new market using non-traditional methods based on mashups, but struggles to achieve this vision. The story illustrates what it takes to achieve cultural change, overturning established business and IT structures. By embracing a service-oriented approach Moneymaker makes Vorpal faster, flexible and more responsive, bringing an end to business as usual. Mashup Corporations takes a unique approach to communicating its message. From the first page, readers will find themselves in a story populated with people who interact in ways that will ring true to others who have struggled to make technology work in an organization, large or small. The conflicts that naturally arise between CEOs, CIOs, and line of business managers illustrate the important issues at stake within Vorpal and most other companies. As the leaders of Vorpal find their way out of their predicament, rules about how mashups and service orientation can be properly applied emerge. These rules, which may be the most enduring contribution of the book, are illustrated and analyzed using real-life examples.

Thomas H. Davenport, Jeanne G. Harris (2007)

Competing on Analytics: The New Science of Winning

Thomas H. Davenport and Jeanne G. Harris explain how many successful organizations are using data creatively to beat the competition. High-performance businesses are now building their competitive strategies around data-driven insights that are, in turn, generating impressive business results. Their secret weapon? Analytics: sophisticated quantitative and statistical analysis and predictive modeling supported by powerful information technology and data-savvy senior leaders. Exemplars of analytics are using new tools to identify their most profitable customers and offer them the right price, to accelerate product innovation, to optimize supply chains, and to identify the true drivers of financial performance. A wealth of examples—from organizations as diverse as Amazon, Barclay's, Capital One, Harrah's, Procter & Gamble, Wachovia and the Boston Red Sox—illuminate how to leverage the power of analytics.

Henry Chesbrough (2006)

Open Business Models: How to Thrive in the New Innovation Landscape

In his landmark book Open Innovation, Henry Chesbrough demonstrated that because useful knowledge is no longer concentrated in a few large organizations, business leaders must adopt a new, 'open' model of innovation. Using this model, companies look outside their boundaries for ideas and intellectual property (IP) they can bring in, as well as license their unutilized home-grown IP to other organizations. In Open Business Models, Chesbrough takes readers to the next step - explaining how to make money in an open innovation landscape. He provides a diagnostic instrument enabling you to assess your company's current business model, and explains how to overcome common barriers to creating a more open model. He also offers compelling examples of companies that have developed such models - including Procter & Gamble, IBM, and Air Products. In addition, Chesbrough introduces a new set of players - 'innovation intermediaries' - who facilitate companies' access to external technologies. He explores the impact of stronger IP protection on intermediate markets for innovation, and profiles firms (such as Intellectual Ventures and Qualcomm) that center their business model on innovation and IP. This vital resource provides a much-needed road map to connect innovation with IP management, so companies can create and capture value from ideas and technologies - wherever in the world they are found.

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David Apgar (2006)

Risk Intelligence: Learning to Manage What We Don't Know

Risk Intelligence gives executives and business managers a simple mental model and simple tools to manage these risks. According to the author's model, risks fall into two categories: knowable and therefore learnable, and unknowable and therefore difficult to prepare for. The book not only shows readers how to analyse their knowable risks but helps them to appreciate the quality and utility of their own analysis. As it turns out, some people have a higher risk IQ than others and therefore analyse and manage risks more effectively. This book helps people of all risk aptitudes to assess and improve their risk IQs.

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Jeanne Ross, Peter Weill, David Robertson (2006)

Enterprise Architecture As Strategy: Creating a Foundation for Business Execution

Enterprise architecture defines a firm’s needs for standardized tasks, job roles, systems, infrastructure, and data in core business processes. Thus, it helps a company to articulate how it will compete in a digital economy and it guides managers’ daily decisions to realize their vision of success. This book clearly explains enterprise architecture’s vital role in enabling - or constraining - the execution of business strategy. The book provides clear frameworks, thoughtful case examples, and a proven-effective structured process for designing and implementing effective enterprise architectures.

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Eric A. Marks, Michael Bell (2006)

Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA): A Planning and Implementation Guide for Business and Technology

Amazon: The book shows you how to plan, implement, and achieve SOA value through its prescriptive approach, joining the business and strategic perspective to the technical and architectural perspective. Applicable to all industries, technology platforms, and operating environments, this innovative book provides you with the essential strategies to drive greater value from your SOA and realize your business goals.

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