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Social Media and Enterprise 2.0

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Blogging :: Enterprise 2.0 :: Online communities

Resources


Anthony J. Bradley and Mark P. McDonald (2011)
The Social Organization: How to Use Social Media to Tap the Collective Genius of Your Customers and Employees

Being a social organization goes beyond experimenting with social media technology tools - the provide and pray approach. In fact, it is not about the technology at all. A social organization addresses significant business challenges and opportunities using the social media platform to create mass collaboration - what Gartner predicts will be the next evolutionary pillar defining how work gets done around the world. Mass collaboration extends beyond social media to enable your employees, customers, suppliers and all other stakeholders to participate directly in the creation of value. That, in broad strokes, is the promise of social media, declare Anthony J. Bradley and Mark P. McDonald, authors of The Social Organization, which reveals how executives from CEOs to managers can make mass collaboration a source of enduring competitive advantage in their enterprise.
- Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 - Enterprise 2.0 -
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Sören Stamer and Willms Buhse (Eds) (2008)
Enterprise 2.0 - The Art of Letting Go

The book contains articles by renowned international authors in the field such as Andrew McAfee, Don Tapscott, and David Weinberger, while also presenting selected case studies from Nokia, SAP, Vodafone, and others. The authors address the question of how Web 2.0 technologies can be usefully incorporated as tools within the enterprise. How can one best utilize the advantages and potential represented by Enterprise 2.0? How will an enterprise culture need to change in order to survive as an Enterprise 2.0 organization? Does management benefit from “letting go” and delegating its authority?
- Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 - Enterprise 2.0 -
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Andrew McAfee (2009)
Enterprise 2.0: New Collaborative Tools for Your Organization's Toughest Challenges

"Web 2.0" is the portion of the Internet that's interactively produced by many people; it includes Wikipedia, Facebook, Twitter, Delicious, and prediction markets. In just a few years, Web 2.0 communities have demonstrated astonishing levels of innovation, knowledge accumulation, collaboration, and collective intelligence. Now, leading organizations are bringing the Web's novel tools and philosophies inside, creating Enterprise 2.0. In this book, Andrew McAfee shows how they're doing this, and why it's benefiting them. Enterprise 2.0 makes clear that the new technologies are good for much more than just socializing-when properly applied, they help businesses solve pressing problems, capture dispersed and fast-changing knowledge, highlight and leverage expertise, generate and refine ideas, and harness the wisdom of crowds. Most organizations, however, don't find it easy or natural to use these new tools initially. And executives see many possible pitfalls associated with them. Enterprise 2.0 explores these concerns, and shows how business leaders can overcome them. McAfee brings together case studies and examples with key concepts from economics, sociology, computer science, consumer psychology, and management studies and presents them all in a clear, accessible, and entertaining style. Enterprise 2.0 is a must-have resource for all C-suite executives seeking to make technology decisions that are simultaneously powerful, popular, and pragmatic.
- Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 - Innovation - Enterprise 2.0 -
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John Gøtze, Christian Bering (2009)
State of the eUnion: Government 2.0 and Onwards

The book State of the eUnion: Government 2.0 and Onwards was released at 00:00 CET on 18th November 2009. Edited by John Gøtze and Christian Bering Pedersen, and foreworded by Don Tapscott, the book is a cornucopia of ideas and experiences from thought-leaders on three continents.
- Netpolitics - eGovernment - Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 - Public Policy -
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John Gøtze at Twitter

John at Twitter
- Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -

Charlene Li and Josh Bernoff (2008)
Groundswell: Winning in a World Transformed by Social Technologies

Corporate executives are struggling with a new trend: people using online social technologies (blogs, social networking sites, YouTube, podcasts) to discuss products and companies, write their own news, and find their own deals. This groundswell is global, it s unstoppable, it affects every industry and it s utterly foreign to the powerful companies running things now. When consumers you ve never met are rating your company s products in public forums with which you have no experience or influence, your company is vulnerable. In Groundswell, Charlene Li and Josh Bernoff of Forrester, Inc. explain how to turn this threat into an opportunity.
- Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -
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Andrew Keen (2007)
The Cult of the Amateur: How blogs, MySpace, YouTube and the rest of today's user-generated media are killing our culture and economy

Keen's relentless "polemic" is on target about how a sea of amateur content threatens to swamp the most vital information and how blogs often reinforce one's own views rather than expand horizons. But his jeremiad about the death of "our cultural standards and moral values" heads swiftly downhill. Keen became somewhat notorious for a 2006 Weekly Standard essay equating Web 2.0 with Marxism; like Karl Marx, he offers a convincing overall critique but runs into trouble with the details. Readers will nod in recognition at Keen's general arguments—sure, the Web is full of "user-generated nonsense"!—but many will frown at his specific examples, which pretty uniformly miss the point. It's simply not a given, as Keen assumes, that Britannica is superior to Wikipedia, or that record-store clerks offer sounder advice than online friends with similar musical tastes, or that YouTube contains only "one or two blogs or songs or videos with real value." And Keen's fears that genuine talent will go unnourished are overstated: writers penned novels before there were publishers and copyright law; bands recorded songs before they had major-label deals. In its last third, the book runs off the rails completely, blaming Web 2.0 for online poker, child pornography, identity theft and betraying "Judeo-Christian ethics."
- Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -
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Amy Shuen (2008)
Web 2.0: A Strategy Guide

Web 2.0 makes headlines, but how does it make money? This concise guide explains what's different about Web 2.0 and how those differences can improve your company's bottom line. Whether you're an executive plotting the next move, a small business owner looking to expand, or an entrepreneur planning a startup, "Web 2.0: A Strategy Guide" illustrates through real-life examples how businesses, large and small, are creating new opportunities on today's Web. This book is about strategy. Rather than focus on the technology, the examples concentrate on its effect. You will learn that creating a Web 2.0 business, or integrating Web 2.0 strategies with your existing business, means creating places online where people like to come together to share what they think, see, and do. When people come together over the Web, the result can be much more than the sum of the parts. The customers themselves help build the site, as old-fashioned 'word of mouth' becomes hypergrowth."Web 2.0 : A Strategy Guide" demonstrates the power of this new paradigm by examining how: Flickr, a classic user-driven business, created value for itself by helping users create their own value; Google made money with a model based on free search, and changed the rules for doing business on the Web-opening opportunities you can take advantage of; social network effects can support a business-ever wonder how FaceBook grew so quickly?; and, businesses like Amazon tap into the Web as a source of indirect revenue, using creative new approaches to monetize the investments they've made in the Web. Written by Amy Shuen, an authority on Silicon Valley business models and innovation economics, "Web 2.0: A Strategy Guide" explains how to transform your business by looking at specific practices for integrating Web 2.0 with what you do. If you're executing business strategy and want to know how the Web is changing business, this book is for you.
- Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -
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Is Google's Knol already becoming a den of spam?

Doc Searls: Heard about Knol yet? It's Google's Xth new service, and it's a place where you can put up "an authoritative article about a specific topic". That's a knol too. Article=knol. My first encounter with Knol was at Pointless Games, an entry by my friend Bernie DeKoven, a funsmith of the first water balloon. A knol, Knol tells us, is "a unit of knowledge". I used to think a thought was one one of those, and I maybe even wrote that once somewhere; but when I search Google now for results that include my surname and exclude knol and google (specifically, searls "unit of knowledge " -google -knol) I find nothing but articles by Searle, who apparently did say that. (Hard to tell. All the results are for abstracts of academic articles buried behind usewalls of various kinds. Meanwhile it annoys me that Google includes misspellings in its "advanced" search.) Naturally, Knol is being covered as a "rival" to Wikipedia. That's exactly what CNet/ZDNet calls it. Social Computing Magazine calls it "The Wikipedia with a business model". TechLounge calls it "Google's Wikipedia".
- Knowledge Management - Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -

Toby Segaran (2007)
Programming Collective Intelligence: Building Smart Web 2.0 Applications

Want to tap the power behind search rankings, product recommendations, social bookmarking, and online matchmaking? This fascinating book demonstrates how you can build Web 2.0 applications to mine the enormous amount of data created by people on the Internet. With the sophisticated algorithms in this book, you can write smart programs to access interesting datasets from other web sites, collect data from users of your own applications, and analyze and understand the data once you've found it. Programming Collective Intelligence takes you into the world of machine learning and statistics, and explains how to draw conclusions about user experience, marketing, personal tastes, and human behavior in general -- all from information that you and others collect every day. Each algorithm is described clearly and concisely with code that can immediately be used on your web site, blog, Wiki, or specialized application. This book explains: Collaborative filtering techniques that enable online retailers to recommend products or media Methods of clustering to detect groups of similar items in a large dataset Search engine features -- crawlers, indexers, query engines, and the PageRank algorithm Optimization algorithms that search millions of possible solutions to a problem and choose the best one Bayesian filtering, used in spam filters for classifying documents based on word types and other features Using decision trees not only to make predictions, but to model the way decisions are made Predicting numerical values rather than classifications to build price models Support vector machines to match people in online dating sites Non-negative matrix factorization to find the independent features in adataset Evolving intelligence for problem solving -- how a computer develops its skill by improving its own code the more it plays a game Each chapter includes exercises for extending the algorithms to make them more powerful. Go beyond simple database-backed applications and put the wealth of Internet data to work for you.
- Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 - Collective Intelligence -
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Hack, Mash & Peer: Crowdsourcing Government Transparency

Jerry Brito, George Mason University Mercatus Center. October 21, 2007. In order to hold government accountable for its actions, citizens must know what those actions are. To that end, they must insist that government act openly and transparently to the greatest extent possible. In the Twenty-First Century, this entails making its data available online and easy to access. If government data is made available online in useful and flexible formats, citizens will be able to utilize modern Internet tools to shed light on government activities. Such tools include mashups, which highlight hidden connections between different data sets, and crowdsourcing, which makes light work of sifting through mountains of data by focusing thousands of eyes on a particular set of data. Today, however, the state of government's online offerings is very sad indeed. Some nominally publicly available information is not online at all, and the data that is online is often not in useful formats. Government should be encouraged to release public information online in a structured, open, and searchable manner. To the extent that government does not modernize, however, we should hope that private third parties build unofficial databases and make these available in a useful form to the public.
- eGovernment - E-Democracy - Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 - Transparency -

DBpedia.org

DBpedia is a community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and to make this information available on the Web. DBpedia allows you to ask sophisticated queries against Wikipedia and to link other datasets on the Web to Wikipedia data.
- Metadata - Semantic Web - Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -

Yochai Benkler (2007)
The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom

With the radical changes in information production that the Internet has introduced, we stand at an important moment of transition, says Yochai Benkler in this thought-provoking book. The phenomenon he describes as social production is reshaping markets, while at the same time offering new opportunities to enhance individual freedom, cultural diversity, political discourse, and justice. But these results are by no means inevitable: a systematic campaign to protect the entrenched industrial information economy of the last century threatens the promise of today’s emerging networked information environment. In this comprehensive social theory of the Internet and the networked information economy, Benkler describes how patterns of information, knowledge, and cultural production are changing—and shows that the way information and knowledge are made available can either limit or enlarge the ways people can create and express themselves. He describes the range of legal and policy choices that confront us and maintains that there is much to be gained—or lost—by the decisions we make today.
- Knowledge Management - Markets - Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -
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Barry Libert, Jon Spector, Don Tapscott (2007)
We Are Smarter Than Me: How to Unleash the Power of Crowds in Your Business

Wikinomics and The Wisdom of Crowds identified the phenomena of emerging social networks, but they do not confront how businesses can profit from the wisdom of crowds. WE ARE SMARTER THAN ME by Barry Libert and Jon Spector, Foreword by Wikinomics author Don Tapscott, is the first book to show anyone in business how to profit from the wisdom of crowds. Drawing on their own research and the insights from an enormous community of more than 4,000 people, Barry Libert and Jon Spector have written a book that reveals what works, and what doesn't, when you are building community into your decision making and business processes. In We Are Smarter Than Me, you will discover exactly how to use social networking and community in your business, driving better decision-making and greater profitability. The book shares powerful insights and new case studies from product development, manufacturing, marketing, customer service, finance, management, and beyond. You'll learn which business functions can best be accomplished or supported by communities; how to provide effective moderation, balance structure with independence, manage risk, define success, implement effective metrics, and much more. From tools and processes to culture and leadership, We Are Smarter than Me will help you transform the promise of social networking into a profitable reality.
- Knowledge Management - Markets - Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -
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Don Tapscott, Anthony Williams (2007)
Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything

Today, encyclopedias, jetliners, operating systems, mutual funds, and many other items are being created by teams numbering in the thousands or even millions. While some leaders fear the heaving growth of these massive online communities, Wikinomics proves this fear is folly. Smart firms can harness collective capability and genius to spur innovation, growth, and success. A brilliant guide to one of the most profound changes of our time, Wikinomics challenges our most deeply-rooted assumptions about business and will prove indispensable to anyone who wants to understand competitiveness in the twenty-first century. Based on a $9 million research project led by bestselling author Don Tapscott, Wikinomics shows how masses of people can participate in the economy like never before. They are creating TV news stories, sequencing the human genome, remixing their favorite music, designing software, finding a cure for disease, editing school texts, inventing new cosmetics, or even building motorcycles. You'll read about: • Rob McEwen, the Goldcorp, Inc. CEO who used open source tactics and an online competition to save his company and breathe new life into an old-fashioned industry. • Flickr, Second Life, YouTube, and other thriving online communities that transcend social networking to pioneer a new form of collaborative production. • Mature companies like Procter & Gamble that cultivate nimble, trust-based relationships with external collaborators to form vibrant business ecosystems. An important look into the future, Wikinomics will be your road map for doing business in the twenty-first century.
- Knowledge Management - Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -
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Web 9.75

Shelley Powers: We can talk about Web 1.0, or 2.0, or 3.0, but my favorite is Web 9.75, or Web Nine and Three-Quarters. It reminds me of the train platform in the Harry Potter books, which could only be found by wizards. In other words, only found by the people who need it, while the rest of the world thinks it's rubbish. There are as many webs as there are possible combinations of all technologies. Then again, there are many webs as people who access them, because we all have our own view of what we want the web to be. Thinking of the web this way keeps it a marvelously fluid and ever changing platform from which to leap unknowing and unseeing. When we name the web, however, give it numbers and constrain it about with rigid descriptions and manufactured requirements, then we really are putting the iron into the cloud; clipping our wings, forcing our feet down paths of others' making. That's not the way to open doors to innovation; that's just the way to sell more seats to a conference.
- Semantic Web - Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -

Sandy Carter (2007)
The New Language of Business: SOA and Web 2.0

In The New Language of Business, senior IBM executive Sandy Carter demonstrates how to leverage SOA, Web 2.0, and related technologies to drive new levels of operational excellence and business innovation. Writing for executives and business leaders inside and outside IT, Carter explains why flexibility and responsiveness are now even more crucial to success–and why services-based strategies offer the greatest promise for achieving them. You’ll learn how to organize your business into reusable process components–and support them with cost-effective IT services that adapt quickly and easily to change. Then, using extensive examples - including a detailed case study describing IBM’s own experience - Carter identifies best practices, pitfalls, and practical starting points for success.
- Service-Oriented Architecture - Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -
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A Mulholland, C, S Thomas, P Kurchina (2007)
Mashup Corporations: The End of Business as Usual

Mashup Corporations: The End of Business As Usual tells the tale of Vorpal Inc., a company that pioneers the implementation of service-oriented architecture to transform its business model. CEO Jane Moneymaker believes in marketing manager Hugo Wunderkind's idea of creating a new market using non-traditional methods based on mashups, but struggles to achieve this vision. The story illustrates what it takes to achieve cultural change, overturning established business and IT structures. By embracing a service-oriented approach Moneymaker makes Vorpal faster, flexible and more responsive, bringing an end to business as usual. Mashup Corporations takes a unique approach to communicating its message. From the first page, readers will find themselves in a story populated with people who interact in ways that will ring true to others who have struggled to make technology work in an organization, large or small. The conflicts that naturally arise between CEOs, CIOs, and line of business managers illustrate the important issues at stake within Vorpal and most other companies. As the leaders of Vorpal find their way out of their predicament, rules about how mashups and service orientation can be properly applied emerge. These rules, which may be the most enduring contribution of the book, are illustrated and analyzed using real-life examples.
- Service-Oriented Architecture - Management - Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -
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The Merging of SOA and Web 2.0

By Darryl K. Taft, 15 July 2007. Dan Cahoon was looking for a way to streamline staffing operations at tax company H&R Block, the nation's largest seasonal employer. Rather than use traditional desktop-based software for the job, the senior systems architect at H&R Block was able to deliver SOA-connected AJAX portlets to more than 12,000 branch offices for temporary work spaces to meet the company's staffing needs.
- Service-Oriented Architecture - Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -

Are You Ready for Mashups?

By Anant Kadiyala. SOA WORLD MAGAZINE, Jun. 28, 2007. With the emergence of Web 2.0 and SOA technologies, mashups have gained in popularity. Web 2.0 provides a rich user experience, and SOA technologies facilitate the underlying flexible plumbing required to make mashups happen. So you could say mashups are a mashup of Web 2.0 and SOA!
- Service-Oriented Architecture - Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -

Mainstream Media Usage of Web 2.0 Services is Increasing

Written by Alex Iskold and edited by Richard MacManus. I was reading a Time magazine article online today, entitled Marketing to your mind. This article was very provocative and I enjoyed reading it. But after I was done, something else caught my attention. I was surprised to see a row of 'web 2.0' buttons at the bottom of the article. Time magazine, a mainstream publication, has an impressive array of web links to these services. Is this an indication that mainstream media has caught the new social media winds? Time magazine after all did name the Web-enabled YOU as their person of the Year last year.
- Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -

Web 2.0 ... The Machine is Us/ing Us

Web 2.0 in just under 5 minutes. By Michael Wesch, Assistant Professor of Cultural Anthropology, Kansas State University.
- Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -

What You Need to Know About Web 2.0

You may have heard the term "Web 2.0" used a lot lately - even on this Web site - and wondered whether Al Gore's been tinkering with the Internet again. Fear not, he's left Silicon Valley and Washington behind to shake things up in Hollywood. Web 2.0 is the name given to a collection of trends that are changing how we all work with the Web, whether as consumers, software developers or business owners. Trends — not technologies — define Web 2.0, because the technologies that underlie this next-generation Web have been around for quite some time. It's the innovations that have sprung from the ubiquity of the Web that are new.
- Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -
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The Myth, Reality and Future of Web 2.0

By Om Malik at GigaOM. This week's hot meme has many of the thought leaders, investors and pundits doing a bit of hand wringing about the whole Web 2.0 thing. Some have called for a sanity check, and others called it a bubblet.
- Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 -
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@gotze