Digitalization

Resources


Added 5 days ago

Jeffrey Alexander Dixon, Kathryn Brohman, Yolande E. Chan (2017)

Dynamic Ambidexterity: Exploiting Exploration for Business Success in the Digital Age

In the digital age, many firms find the pace of change in their industry is increasing. New competitors emerge from previously unrelated industries and innovative digital business models can quickly disrupt well-established market dynamics. Such jolts in the competitive landscape require existing players to be continually innovating while also “keeping the lights on” to maintain existing revenue streams. This paper reviews the IS literature on ambidexterity – the ability to simultaneously pursue strategies of resource exploration and exploitation – and advances a theoretical model for embedding innovative business models into existing organizational routines. It contributes to the literature by reconciling the structural and contextual views of ambidexterity through introducing a dynamic ambidexterity framework. This approach proposes ambidexterity as a dynamic capability which requires differing mechanisms in the initiation and implementation phases of innovation.

Dion Hinchcliffe (2017)

What's really holding back today's CIO from digital transformation?

A new generation of IT leader has been arriving on the scene, more in-tune with the business, more collaborative, and with better soft skills, but a legacy tangle of tech stands in the way of moving towards the future.

Naufal Khan, Gautam Lunawat, and Amit Rahul (2017)

Toward an integrated technology operating model

Companies may be able to get digital transformations off the ground by separating digital from conventional IT, but that approach is not sustainable. Here’s a better way. Technology organizations are now expected to play a central role in helping companies capitalize on new digital capabilities - connectivity, advanced analytics, and automation, for instance. These capabilities can help them build deeper relationships with customers, launch new business models, make processes more efficient, and make better decisions.

Jeanne Ross (2017)

Don’t Confuse Digital With Digitization

Digitization involves standardizing business processes and is associated with cost cutting and operational excellence. In essence, it imposes discipline on business processes that, over the years, were executed by individual heroes in a variety of creative (but not always optimal) ways. SAP, PeopleSoft, and other integrated software packages that burst onto the scene in the 1990s helped lead the way into more digitizing, but it remains a painful process. Today, companies are confronting something new and different: digital. Digital, of course, is an adjective. It refers to a host of powerful, accessible, and potentially game-changing technologies like social, mobile, cloud, analytics, internet of things, cognitive computing, and biometrics. It also refers to the transformation that companies must undergo to take advantage of the opportunities these technologies create. A digital transformation involves rethinking the company’s value proposition, not just its operations. A digital company innovates to deliver enhanced products, services, and customer engagement. Digital is exciting, thrilling — and a bit unnerving!

Dion Hinchcliffe (2017)

The digital transformation of learning: Social, informal, self-service, and enjoyable

Technology has long been used to improve how we learn, but today's digital advances, particularly with social media, have taken learning in powerful new -- and for some -- entirely unexpected directions.

Venkat Atluri, Miklos Dietz, and Nicolaus Henke (2017)

Competing in a world of sectors without borders

Digitization is causing a radical reordering of traditional industry boundaries. What will it take to play offense and defense in tomorrow’s ecosystems? Rakuten Ichiba is Japan’s single largest online retail marketplace. It also provides loyalty points and e-money usable at hundreds of thousands of stores, virtual and real. It issues credit cards to tens of millions of members. It offers financial products and services that range from mortgages to securities brokerage. And the company runs one of Japan’s largest online travel portals—plus an instant-messaging app, Viber, which has some 800 million users worldwide. Retailer? Financial company? Rakuten Ichiba is all that and more—just as Amazon and China’s Tencent are tough to categorize as the former engages in e-commerce, cloud-computing, logistics, and consumer electronics, while the latter provides services ranging from social media to gaming to finance and beyond.

Ranga Rajagopalan (2017)

The Last Mile Of Your Digital Transformation

Containers and cloud infrastructure have become the primary focus for CIOs and CTOs. A Gartner article revealed that containers and infrastructure are two of the top three strategic initiatives for IT organizations (the third is a connective fabric, which I will discuss momentarily). Enterprises are sinking massive amounts of resources into “containerization” and migration programs, but to what end? Modern architectures and infrastructure are just the tools in achieving your digital transformation; however, many organizations are adopting technology for technology’s sake. An article on the Chef blog by Julian Dunn brilliantly articulates this problem, pointing out the haphazardness in the early days of virtualization and providing guidance for those seeking to adopt containers today. Instead of checking all the boxes for containers or clouds, enterprises need to strategize on how to use those tools and, more importantly, focus on what they are building with those tools. Only then can enterprises complete their digital transformation.

Oliver Bossert and Jürgen Laartz (2016)

How enterprise architects can help ensure success with digital transformations

Those who design and steer the development of the technology landscape can mitigate risk by setting operating standards and promoting cross-functional collaboration. Most CEOs understand the potential upside of a digital transformation. If they can get it right, their companies can be more efficient, more agile, and better able to deliver innovative products and services to customers and partners through multiple channels. About 70 percent of executives say that over the next three years, they expect digital trends and initiatives to create greater top-line revenues for their businesses, as well as increased profitability.

Jacques Bughin and Nicolas van Zeebroeck (2017)

New evidence for the power of digital platforms

Incumbents should go on the attack with their own online exchanges. Digital attackers in most industries can severely drain the profits and revenues of incumbent players, as we have shown in recent research. Companies under pressure, though, can limit the damage if they adopt an offensive corporate strategy, one that involves willingly cannibalizing existing businesses and reallocating resources aggressively to new digital models.

Oliver Bossert and Jürgen Laartz (2017)

Perpetual evolution--the management approach required for digital transformation

Companies that commit to continually updating their enterprise architectures can deliver goods and services as fast as Internet-born competitors do. Internet retailers can make crucial changes to their e-commerce websites within hours, while it takes brick-and-mortar retailers three months or more to do the same. Cloud-based enterprise software suppliers can update their products in days or weeks. By contrast, traditional enterprise software companies need months. Why can’t established companies move as quickly as their Internet-born competitors? In part, because they are limited by their enterprise architecture, which is the underlying design and management of the technology platforms and capabilities that support a company’s business strategies.

Bernard Marr (2017)

What Is Digital Twin Technology - And Why Is It So Important?

While the concept of a digital twin has been around since 2002, it’s only thanks to the Internet of Things (IoT) that it has become cost-effective to implement. And, it is so imperative to business today, it was named one of Gartner’s Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2017. Quite simply, a digital twin is a virtual model of a process, product or service. This pairing of the virtual and physical worlds allows analysis of data and monitoring of systems to head off problems before they even occur, prevent downtime, develop new opportunities and even plan for the future by using simulations.

David Kiron (2017)

Why Your Company Needs More Collaboration

Digitization demands a focus on cooperation and collaboration that is unprecedented for most enterprises.What distinguishes companies that have built advanced digital capabilities? The ability to collaborate. MIT Sloan Management Review’s research finds that a focus on collaboration — both within organizations and with external partners and stakeholders — is central to how digitally advanced companies create business value and establish competitive advantage. These companies recognize that digital transformation blurs — and sometimes obliterates — traditional organizational boundaries and demands a focus on cooperation and collaboration that is unprecedented for most enterprises. Based on a global survey of more than 3,500 managers and executives, MIT Sloan Management Review and Deloitte’s third annual report on digital business found that the most digitally advanced companies - those successfully deploying digital technologies and capabilities to improve processes, engage talent across the organization, and drive new value-generating business models - are far more likely to perform cross-functional collaboration. More than 70% of these businesses use cross-functional teams to organize work and charge them with implementing digital business priorities. This compares to less than 30% for organizations in an early stage of digitization.

Connie Moore, Kerry M Finn, Dr Setrag Khoshafian, Kay Winkler, Neil Ward-Dutton, Frank Kowalkowski, Keith D Swenson, Nathaniel Palmer (2017)

Digital Transformation with Business Process Management: BPM Transformation and Real-World Execution

BPM is essential to a company's survival in today's hyper-speed business environment. The goal of Digital Transformation is to help empower enterprises to compete at the highest level in any marketplace. This book provides compelling award-winning case studies contributed by those who have been through the full BPM experience. The case studies describe the processes involved to generate successful ROIs and competitive advantages. Digital transformation describes the changes associated with the application of digital technology in all aspects of human society. These world-renowned authors and leading edge case studies will help you understand the meaning and impact of Digital Transformation and how you can leverage that transformation using BPM you already have. Learn how to extend that into core processes that run the business and thus engage more meaningfully with your customers. The authors discuss the impact of emerging technologies, the mandate for greater transparency and how the ongoing aftershocks of globalization have collectively impacted predictability within the business enterprise.

Stephanie L. Woerner and Peter Weill (2017)

The Harvey Nash / KPMG CIO Survey 2016

Over 600 respondents to the Harvey Nash / KPMG CIO Survey provided additional information, including company name, to take part in further analysis by Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Information Systems Research. MIT CISR is one of the world’s leading IT research organisations.

Gartner: AI, immersion and platform ‘megatrends’ to drive digital business into the 2020s

In addition to the potential impact on businesses, these trends provide a significant opportunity for enterprise architecture leaders to help senior business and IT leaders respond to the digital business opportunities and threats by creating signature-ready actionable and diagnostic deliverables that guide investment decisions.

Richard Veryard (2017)

On the Nature of Platforms

There are several ways of thinking about platforms. Economists tend to view platforms as essentially containers for transactions. Canonical examples: Amazon, Airbnb, iTunes, Netflix, Uber. One of the economic advantages of these transaction platforms is that they also act as container for content. When it launched in 1995, the Amazon website boasted a million books - far more than you could find in any bookshop. (This is related to the concept of the Long Tail.) So it becomes a place you can browse books and check reviews, independently of any intention to buy.

Leading Digital Transformation Is Like Urban Planning

Most companies want their businesses to keep pace with digital startups, but end up bogged down by the need to fix the daily challenges that their decades-old IT systems create. How do you redesign and rebuild major infrastructure while keeping the day-to-day work going? This kind of challenge is often referred to as “repairing the airplane while you’re flying it.” But a more instructive analogy might be the redesign of a major city’s infrastructure.

Some EA Teams Reinventing Themselves as Innovation Coaches

Digitization is rapidly changing the role that IT teams play in their companies but certainly isn't diminishing their importance.

6 Predictions About The Future Of Digital Transformation

Gazing intensely into their respective crystal balls, Gartner, IDC, and Forrester have come up with predictions for 2016 and beyond, highlighting digital transformation and its impact on businesses and consumers worldwide.

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Mark Skilton (2015)

Building Digital Ecosystem Architectures

The design of digital solutions has become a pressing concern for practitioners faced with a plethora of technology impacting their business. From cloud computing to social networks, mobile computing and big data, to the emerging of Internet of things, all of which are changing how enterprise products, services, rooms and buildings are connected to the wider ecosystem of networks and services. This book defines digital ecosystems with examples from real industry cases and explores how enterprise architecture is evolving to enable physical and virtual, social, and material object collaboration and experience. The key topics covered include: Concepts of digitization Types of technological ecosystems Architecting digital workspaces Principles of architecture design Examples architecting digital business models Examples of digital design patterns Methods of monetization

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Vallabh Sambamurthy and Robert Zmud (2015)

Business Platforms, Digital Platforms and Digital Innovation: An Executive Agenda

The second book of a three book series on digitalization management. This book discusses how competitive success is increasingly dependent on the enterprise capabilities to simultaneously exploit their installed business platforms and undertake digital innovation, i.e., what Gartner calls bimodal IT.

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George Westerman, Didier Bonnet, and Andrew McAfee (2015)

Leading Digital

In Leading Digital, authors George Westerman, Didier Bonnet, and Andrew McAfee highlight how large companies in traditional industries—from finance to manufacturing to pharmaceuticals—are using digital to gain strategic advantage. They illuminate the principles and practices that lead to successful digital transformation. Based on a study of more than four hundred global firms the book shows what it takes to become a Digital Master. It explains successful transformation in a clear, two-part framework: where to invest in digital capabilities, and how to lead the transformation.

Martin Ford (2015)

Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of Mass Unemployment

What are the jobs of the future? How many will there be? And who will have them? As technology continues to accelerate and machines begin taking care of themselves, fewer people will be necessary. Artificial intelligence is already well on its way to making “good jobs” obsolete: many paralegals, journalists, office workers, and even computer programmers are poised to be replaced by robots and smart software. As progress continues, blue and white collar jobs alike will evaporate, squeezing working- and middle-class families ever further. At the same time, households are under assault from exploding costs, especially from the two major industries—education and health care—that, so far, have not been transformed by information technology. The result could well be massive unemployment and inequality as well as the implosion of the consumer economy itself. The past solutions to technological disruption, especially more training and education, aren’t going to work. We must decide, now, whether the future will see broad-based prosperity or catastrophic levels of inequality and economic insecurity. Rise of the Robots is essential reading to understand what accelerating technology means for our economic prospects—not to mention those of our children—as well as for society as a whole.

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Mark Raskino and Graham Waller (2015)

Digital to the Core: Remastering Leadership for Your Industry, Your Enterprise, and Yourself

There is no simple strategic method for dealing with the multidimensional nature of digital change. Even the sharpest leaders can become disoriented as change builds on change, leaving almost nothing certain. Yet to stand still is to fail. Enterprises and leaders must re-master themselves to succeed. Leaders must identify the key macro forces, then lead their organizations at three distinct levels: industry, enterprise, and self. By doing this they cannot only survive but clean up. Digital to the Core makes the case that all business leaders must understand the impact the digital revolution will continue to play in their industries, companies, and leadership style and practices. Drawing on interviews with over 30 top C-level executives in some of the world’s most powerful companies and government organizations, including GE, Ford, Tory Burch, Babolat, McDonalds, Publicis and UK Government Digital Service, this book delivers practical insights from those on the front lines of major digital upheaval. The authors incorporate Gartner’s annual CIO and CEO global survey research and also apply the deep knowledge and qualitative insights they have acquired as practitioners, management researchers, and advisors over decades in the business. Above all else, Raskino and Waller want companies and their top leaders to understand the full impact of digital change and integrate it at the core of their businesses.

The Double Game of Digital Strategy

This is the first in a series of articles on setting and executing digital strategies with speed, foresight, and savvy. Digital is often compared to electricity. Both are pervasive, and each has been a fuel for broad-based economic transformation. But the comparison is misleading. Todays production, distribution, and uses of electricity, in spite of significant improvements in efficiency, would be familiar to Tesla and Westinghouse. By contrast, the possibilities and economics of digital - driven by sustained exponential trends like Moores law for processing power and its various derivatives for bandwidth, storage, and more - are constantly changing, enabling new moves and sparking the transformation of industries. As a result, digital strategies need to continually adapt to and seize new opportunities. Executives have to play a double game: making the most out of todays contests while positioning themselves to win in tomorrows.

Digital Taylorism

The Economist: A modern version of scientific management threatens to dehumanise the workplace.

On Digital Healthcare

We represent two venture capital firms, Union Square Ventures and Version One Ventures, that are keenly interested in the healthcare space. While we maintain a traditional market map (i.e. a single Keynote slide collating dozens of company logos squeezed into labeled boxes), we find ourselves with more questions than answers about how the healthcare market will shake out.

Gerald C. Kane, Doug Palmer, Anh Nguyen Phillips, David Kiron & Natasha Buckley

Strategy, not technology, drives digital transformation

What is the most important driver of organizational digital maturity - social, mobile, analytics, or cloud? None of the above, according to the latest MIT Sloan Management Review and Deloitte digital business study.

An introduction to architecting the digital enterprise

Charlie Bess explores the shift from documenting technologies to enabling relationships that will be required to continue generating value for business from IT resources in the digital enterprise.

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Karl-Heinz Streibich (2014)

The Digital Enterprise: The Moves and Motives of the Digital Leaders

This book reflects Karl-Heinz Streibich's optimism about the technology industry and the richness of his connections with industry thought leaders. Throughout the book you will encounter the vision of Industry 4.0 (Industrie 4.0) that is driving innovation across a wide spectrum of industries around the globe. With over 20 examples provided, you will read about GE's vision of the Industrial Internet and how it will bring massive efficiencies to aviation, utilities, and many other industries. You will discover how banks and insurance companies and oil companies and museums and casinos are innovating using a wide range of other technologies. Get ready to be inspired by some of the top companies in the world that are on the forefront of transforming into a Digital Enterprise.